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by Dr. Katz   |   January 9, 2023

Between the Sheets – January 2023

QUESTION FROM PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVOR:

I’m gay. And I’ve had my prostate removed. Will I be able to still stimulate the prostate bed area to orgasm as I did before. Have not tried. Afraid. Thank you.

RESPONSE FROM DR. ANNE KATZ:

The only way to find out is to try! Men have told me that it is stimulation of the prostate itself that produces the sensations and orgasm. But maybe the stimulation of the rectal wall/prostate bed will do it too. 

My suggestion is to either try yourself with a vibrator (be gentle!) or with a trusted partner who will be gentle. Lots of lube and lots of breathing to relax, and a safe word if you want him to stop/pull out/go slow.

You can also ask other men who have had the surgery, but remember that everyone is different.

ZERO offers resources, including support groups to help you to get in touch with other gay men who can give you their advice. 


QUESTION FROM PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVOR:

When is it safe to resume receptive anal intercourse after radical prostatectomy?

RESPONSE FROM DR. ANNE KATZ:

It is generally considered safe to engage in receptive anal intercourse six weeks after radical prostatectomy. For those who are interested, here is additional information from pre-diagnostic testing to radiation therapy:

  • Before a PSA blood test – one week (may lead to an inaccurate result).
  • Following a transrectal biopsy (TRUS) – two weeks (may cause bleeding, pain, or increase the risk of infection).
  • Following a transperineal biopsy – one week (to allow bruising to settle, and reduce painful intercourse).
  • During external beam radiotherapy and two months afterwards (could make acute side effects worse, be painful, or result in long term complications such as rectal bleeding).
  • After brachytherapy – abstain for six months to minimize radiation exposure for insertive partner.

Dr. Katz has just released the second edition of her book Prostate Cancer and the Man You Love: Supporting and Caring for Your Loved One. The book is available at a 30% discount using the code RLFANDF30 when ordering at  www.rowman.com.

Do you have a question about sexual health or intimacy? If so, we invite you to send it to ZERO. We’ll select questions to feature in future Between the Sheets columns. Please email your question to: bts@zerocancer.org.