X
Search
X

Subscribe to our E-Newsletter

Stay up-to-date on the latest news about prostate cancer. Join our distribution list to receive periodic email updates and our monthly e-newsletter.

Scott Moore

Scott Moore was driving home from work one day when intuition stopped him in his tracks. Something just didn’t feel right to Scott, so he scheduled a physical exam and bloodwork with a new doctor, though he’d just had one a few months earlier.

After a repeat PSA and antibiotics, his doctor recommended he see a urologist for a DRE. During the exam, his doctor felt a large mass and recommended a biopsy, following which he was diagnosed with a slow-growing form of prostate cancer. The mass was so large, his doctor told him, that it must have been growing for at least a decade with no symptoms. He was 56 years old.

He decided to treat his disease with HIFU and was monitored closely by his doctor thereafter due to concern that his cancer may have spread. Though his PSA has begun to rise again, Scott maintains a positive attitude and credits his wife – who lost her father to prostate cancer – for helping him deal with his diagnosis and treatment.

If there are angels in the world, my wife is one of them – she and I got through this together.

Throughout his journey, he has continued to raise awareness in his community through the ZERO Run/Walk in Long Beach and by sharing his story in his workplace. The first year he participated in the ZERO Run/Walk, his team had only 6 people on it. In 2016, his team grew to 87 members and he was one of the top fundraisers. Scott also spreads awareness by encouraging men in his workplace to talk to their doctors about being tested.

It wasn’t until I was diagnosed with prostate cancer and got involved in the ZERO Run/Walk that I realized how prevalent the disease is. I was surprised by how many people I knew were touched by it, or had lost a man to it, and just hadn’t openly discussed it before.

This year Scott is spending his 60th birthday speaking to a support group to show men that there is hope. He is going in for a bone scan to determine whether his cancer has spread, and he calls on his inner strength and positive attitude to get through the toughest times. He is determined to do whatever it takes so that no more men have to hear that they have prostate cancer.

My inner strength comes from fighting for my wife, my sons, and my family, in addition to myself. Any day that I wake up and I’m looking at the roses instead of the roots, I say that’s a damn good day.

IMG_1715

SCS_0881