X
Search
X

Subscribe to our E-Newsletter

Stay up-to-date on the latest news about prostate cancer. Join our distribution list to receive periodic email updates and our monthly e-newsletter.

Dan Brown

A dedicated road cyclist and hiker, Dan Brown began his prostate cancer journey with a back injury over Thanksgiving 2016. Since he was approaching 50, he didn’t think much of it. As the pain continued to get worse, Dan’s doctor performed a few blood tests to get to the root of the problem. In April 2017 his doctor shared a diagnosis Dan didn’t expect: he had prostate cancer that had metastasized to his bones.

I’ve learned a lot about this disease over the past few months, including how to fight back. I’ve learned that my ‘mental game’ is just as critical to my progress as any other factor. I’m thankful that I have options that were not available just a few years ago. In fact, I have genomic testing on my near-term roadmap.

Since his diagnosis, Dan’s been treated with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) and 10 rounds of radiation therapy to shrink a few tumors that were in danger of compressing his spinal chord. But he won’t let prostate cancer slow him down. He’s back to being almost as physically active as he always was, which includes travel and riding his bike three or four times a week.

Prostate cancer has slowed me down a bit, but it sure hasn’t stopped me.

As he battles the disease, Dan does as much research as he can about new treatment options, ideal diet tips, exercise suggestions, and how to maintain a positive attitude.

When I was first diagnosed, I avoided searching the internet for details about my illness since the stuff I was finding initially was quite cynical and negative. However I soon realized that I needed to get smarter about my treatment options. That’s when I came across ZERO. I like that the information I find there is factual and doesn’t promote uncertainty and doubt like some of the other sites I’ve come across

He’s hopeful that the new treatments being developed will prove promising in managing his disease.

Dealing with cancer is like a chess match, and when it comes to my treatments my goal is to always plan two or three moves ahead. My approach to cancer is this: we can’t control what life hands us, we can only control how we respond to it.

Check out his new “Facing Stave IV Cancer with Optimism” YouTube channel.